Home / Business & Investment News / Thousands of flyers have been caught trying to smuggle loaded guns onto American planes

Thousands of flyers have been caught trying to smuggle loaded guns onto American planes

ON JANUARY 6th, a gunman ran amok at Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood International Airport, killing five people. Earlier this week, Esteban Ruiz Santiago, a 26-year-old Iraq war veteran, appeared in court charged in relation to the horrific crime. If convicted, the judge told him, he could face the death penalty.

Mr Santiago allegedly pulled a gun out of his luggage in the baggage reclaim area. Although he appears to have a history of questionable mental behaviour, including entering an FBI building with a magazine of ammunition, he had probably checked his weapon into the hold of his flight legally. According to Transport Security Administration (TSA) rules, “You may transport unloaded firearms in a locked hard-sided container as checked baggage only. Declare the firearm and/or ammunition to the airline when checking your bag at the ticket counter. The container must completely secure the firearm from being accessed.”

Yet despite such an easy-going attitude to allowing passengers legitimately to fly with guns, an increasing number try to do so illegally, by sneaking firearms…Continue reading Click Here For Original Source Of The Article

Amazon Auto Links: the template could not be found. Try reselecting the template in the unit option page.

Check Also

Two big European makers of eyewear agree to merge

GIANT, cross-border mergers in Europe have been rare in recent years. Deals fail to happen even when mid-sized companies—such as family-owned and run specialist manufacturers in northern Italy or the Mittelstand in Germany—have the chance to gain global heft. For that blame founding owner-managers, many of whom are reluctant to lose control of treasured companies. Blame too an artisanal culture, particularly in southern Europe, in which firms’ owners say they are content to remain small and relatively obscure. Occasionally, too, nationalist politicians block efforts by perfidious foreigners to snaffle prized local brands.

Now, though, one of the largest-ever mergers in Europe actually looks set to go ahead. Luxottica, an Italian maker of fancy specs that was founded in 1961—it owns brands such as Ray Ban and Oakley—is to merge with Essilor, a spiffy French producer of lenses. The joint entity is set to combine Italian style with deft French engineering. The deal is supposed to be completed by the end of the year, creating a new entity with a market value of €46bn ($49bn), 140,000 staff and annual revenues of €15bn. It will be...Continue reading

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

css.php